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Friday, July 17, 2020 | History

5 edition of Gospel of John in the sixteenth century found in the catalog.

Gospel of John in the sixteenth century

the Johannine exegesis of Wolfgang Musculus

by Craig S. Farmer

  • 127 Want to read
  • 28 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Musculus, Wolfgang, 1497-1563.,
  • Bible. N.T. John -- Criticism, interpretation, etc. -- History -- 16th century.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 231-241) and index.

    StatementCraig S. Farmer.
    SeriesOxford studies in historical theology
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBS2615.M873 F35 1997
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxii, 250 p. ;
    Number of Pages250
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL986645M
    ISBN 100195099036
    LC Control Number96024737

      This aligns with John’s stated objective to write an account so that those who hear it may believe. 8. John’s gospel is more theology than history. From the very beginning, the Book of John focuses on the implications of who Jesus was and what he did more than the other gospels. In the 15th and the 16th centuries some new approaches to harmony began to appear, e.g. Jean Gerson produced a harmony which gave priority to the Gospel of John. Cornelius Jansen (Bishop of Ghent) also published his harmony (), focusing on the four gospels and even referring to the Acts of the Apostles. On the other hand John Calvin's approach focused on the three synoptic Gospels, and.

    John's gospel is different from the other three in the New Testament. That fact has been recognized since the early church itself. Already by the year , John's gospel was called the spiritual.   "The New Commentary on the Whole Bible" asserts that its earliest appearance was in a 5 th century CE manuscript which they do not define. It was present in the version of John that St. Augustine ( CE) used when he wrote his "Tractates on the Gospel of John" on or after us "Church History" was written circa CE.

    John There is Absolutely No Need for Despair. And therefore, there’s absolutely, as Bishop Sheen would say, no need for despair. Because the Advocate that you have, the Proclaimer of the good news that you have is perfect hope itself, the complete antidote to despair. Traditionally, the book of Revelation has been dated near the end of the first century, around A.D. Some writers, however, have advanced the preterist (from a Latin word meaning “that which is past”) view, contending that the Apocalypse was penned around A.D. 68 or 69, and thus the thrust of the book is supposed to relate to the impending destruction of Jerusalem (A.D. 70).


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Gospel of John in the sixteenth century by Craig S. Farmer Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Gospel of John in the Sixteenth Century: The Johannine Exegesis of Wolfgang Musculus (Oxford Studies in Historical Theology) 1st Edition by Craig S. Farmer (Author)Author: Craig S. Farmer. This study of Johannine exegesis in the sixteenth century covers nearly every important commentator on John from the first half of the century, and examines the medieval and patristic traditions on which they drew.

But while comprehensive in its scope, this book centers on the John commentary of Wolfgang Musculus ( ), an influential leader of the Protestant Reformation in the cities of Augsburg and Bern. Craig S. Farmer. Oxford Studies in Historical Theology. Description. This study of Johannine exegesis in the sixteenth century covers nearly every important commentator on John from the first half of the century, and examines the medieval and patristic traditions on which they drew.

But while comprehensive in its scope, this book centers on the John commentary of Wolfgang Musculus (. This book is a wide-ranging study of Johannine exegesis in the sixteenth century, centered on the John commentary of Wolfgang Musculus (), an influential leader of the Protestant Farmer compares Musculus's exegesis of the Johannine miracle stories not only with that of other sixteenth-century commentators but also with ancient and medieval commentaries.

The Gospel of John is the latest-written of the four biographies of Jesus that have been preserved in the New Testament. The Gospels, the first four books of the New Testament, tell the story of the life of Jesus.

Yet only one—the Gospel of John—claims to be an eyewitness account, the testimony of the unnamed “disciple whom Jesus loved.”. BAS Logo. BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY SOCIETY. The Gospel of John, the fourth of the gospels, is a highly schematic account of the ministry of Jesus, with seven "signs" culminating in the raising of Lazarus (foreshadowing the resurrection of Jesus) and seven "I am" discourses culminating in Thomas's proclamation of the risen Jesus as "my Lord and my God"; the concluding verses set out its purpose, "that you may believe that Jesus is the.

In large part it has happened because of a shift in scholarly opinion about the interrelationship of the four gospels which placed John’s Gospel late in the first century (actually, it would have been pushed well into the second century, as F.

Baur and the “Tbingen School”. The Gospel of John in the sixteenth century: the Johannine exegesis of Wolfgang Musculus. [Craig S Farmer] -- "This study of Johannine exegesis in the sixteenth century covers nearly ever important commentator on John from the first half of the century, and.

Early church historical writings from early second century AD recognize the Gospel of John as a sacred book. Theophilus of Antioch ( AD) was the first to write the name John as the author. Shortly after this Irenaeus identified John as the disciple who had leaned on Jesus' breast.

Historians have credited--or blamed--Calvinism for many developments in the modern world, including capitalism, modern science, secularization, democracy, individualism, and unitarianism. These same historians, however, have largely ignored John Calvin the man.

When people consider him at all, they tend to view him as little more than the joyless tyrant of Geneva who created an abstract /5(2). This suggests a date for John to be at least around the turn of the century. Ireneaus stated that John remained in Ephesus until the time of Trajan (AD ).

This would place John’s writing during the last decades of the first century. Therefore, if John is the author of the Gospel, then a date between seems to be possible. 19 Now this was John’s testimony when the Jewish leaders # The Greek term traditionally translated the Jews (hoi Ioudaioi) refers here and elsewhere in John’s Gospel to those Jewish leaders who opposed Jesus; also in15,16; ,11,13; ; ,28,36; ,12,31,38; in Jerusalem sent priests and Levites to ask him who he.

Gospel According to John, fourth of the four New Testament narratives recounting the life and death of Jesus ’s is the only one of the four not considered among the Synoptic Gospels (i.e., those presenting a common view).

Although the Gospel is ostensibly written by St. John the Apostle, “the beloved disciple” of Jesus, there has been considerable discussion of the actual.

In John Calvin: A Sixteenth Century Portrait, William J. Bouwsma presents a different perspective on the life and various aspects of the thought of the French reformer. In this work, Bouwsma states that his main goal in writing this book is “to interpret Calvin as a figure of his time: as a representative French intellectual, an evangelical Reviews:   Landscape of the Gospel of John John wrote the Gospel sometime after 70 A.D.

and the destruction of Jerusalem, but prior to his exile on the island of Patmos—around A.D. It was most likely written from Ephesus. Settings in the book include Bethany, Galilee, Capernaum, Jerusalem, Judea, and Samaria. Whereas Mark’s Gospel brings us the texture of first-century Palestine with a vivid, concrete, and earthy Jesus, John’s Gospel is filled with long discourses describing Jesus’s divinity.

John takes us behind Jesus’s ministry, where we get a glimpse of what it means to believe in Jesus as flesh of the eternal and living God, as the. Irenaeus, writing at about ADsays that the Beloved Disciple was John, the disciple of Jesus, and that John originated the Gospel at Ephesus.

Irenaeus even writes that when he himself was young, he knew another teacher, Polycarp, Bishop of Smyrna (c. AD 69–), who claimed to have been tutored by John. Part poetic masterpiece, part mystic treatise, The Dark Night of the Soul by 16th century Carmelite monk St.

John of the Cross, addresses the feeling of being forgotten by the Presence of the Almighty that every Christian desirous of walking more closely with God must pass through in.

A gospel (a contraction of Old English god spel meaning "good news/glad tidings", comparable to Greek εὐαγγέλιον, evangelion) is a written account of the career and teachings of Jesus.

The term originally meant the Christian message itself, but in the second century, it came to be used for the books in which the message was set out. Gospels are a genre of Early Christian literature.

John is the last Gospel and, in many ways, different from the Synoptic Gospels. The question in the Synoptic Gospels concerns the extent to which the divine reality broke into history in Jesus’ coming, and the answers are given in terms of the closeness of the new age.

John, from the very beginning, presents Jesus in terms of glory: the Christ, the exalted Lord, mighty from the beginning and throughout his. All of the books of the New Testament were written within a lifetime of the death of Jesus of Nazareth.

Not so the so-called “other gospels,” which were pseudepigraphical Gnostic works written years later. To date we have over Greek manuscripts of the New Testament, with an astounding million pages of biblical.In the Gospel of John, the portrayal of Jesus is full of mystery.

_____ was the dominant authority in Christian theology from the fifth century until the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Thomas Aquinas _____, a Dominican priest, blended the philosophical thoughts of Aristotle with Christian scripture through writings such as.